Chris Farrington

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Chris Farrington, also known as his fursona, Kelvin the Lion, is a comic artist. His primary creations include Macropod Madness, 11 Will Die, Nivlek, and Kitty Omega. He has also made a few experimental mini-comics, such as Hell's Leftovers, The Lie, and The Generic Adventurers. Many of his comics and other artwork involve the topics of transformation, vorarephilia, and babyfur material. He has collaborated with friend, Jennifer Brown, in some of his works. He is a graduate of Savannah State University in Georgia, a school known for their instruction in drawing animals, and currently[when?] resides in the nearby area.

Kelvin the Lion is the fursona of comic artist Chris Farrington. He has been known to make cameos in numerous comics, most notably Macropod Madness.

Originally, Kelvin himself was one of the main characters in one early comic series, Hell's Leftovers. Since then, he is a frequent host (like Bill Cosby for the Fat Albert series) of his webcomics, making such cameos.

Another of handiest cameo-hostings was in Kitty Omega, where he explains a few interesting odds-and-ends in the whole concept of the comic-story.

"The Lie" is a mini-comic by Kelvin the Lion, from 2000. Being rather zany, and taking place somewhere in the Australian outback, the story of "The Lie" is where a daffy platypus makes a knucklehead of himself, talking ridiculous rubbish. And not alone, the platypus is acquainted by a grey kangaroo, whom he attempts seeking some truth. Still, the gibberish goes on!

This comic remains rather inconclusive, for Kelvin intended it to be done in seven pages, each (via the coloured settings) in colours of the rainbow (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet), in no particular order. However only four (in orange, violet, green, and blue) renderings materialized, leaving the rest a mystery.

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